Sponsor a Child in Albania

Sponsored girl smiling in SOS Village in Albania
Sponsor a Child in India
in Albania

SOS Children's Villages started its work in Albania in 1992. SOS Children's Villages involvement in Albania has grown in recent years, and includes the provision of day-care, primary and secondary education, vocational training and counselling to support children, young people and families near the capital city of Tirana. At present there is one SOS Children's Village in Albania, one SOS Kindergarten, one SOS Youth Facility, one SOS Hermann Gmeiner School and three SOS Social Centres (family strengthening programmes).

Map of SOS in Albania - Sponsor a child in AlbaniaSOS Children's Villages in Albania

SOS Children's Villages started its work in Albania in June 1992 after SOS Children's Villages co-workers visited several national children's homes in the country's capital, Tirana and SOS Children's Villages decided to act by starting up a centre in Tirana. Children and families from the local communities can find support from SOS Children’s Villages. The organisation works with local agencies to provide a variety of programmes which enable children to grow up in their families. If children cannot stay with their families, they can be looked after by the SOS mothers. Young people can live semi-independently in flats until they are ready to live on their own. 

Sponsor a Child in Albania

SOS relies on the kindness and generosity of Canadians to be able to provide a home for the most vulnerable children of Albania.

By becoming a child sponsor you are making a commitment to helping an individual child in need. Your gift will help provide a child with food, clothing, education and a loving SOS mother.

Please help us ensure a loving home for every Albanian child. Sponsor a child in Albania now. Your donation will help change an orphaned or abandoned child's life.

Some facts about Albania 

Albania is located in south-eastern Europe. The country is bordered by the Adriatic Sea to the west, Greece to the south, the Republic of Macedonia to the east, Montenegro to the north and Kosovo to the north-east. The capital and most important city is Tirana. There are just under 3 million people living in Albania, of which 32.6 per cent are children under the age of 18. 

The main religion is Islam (70 per cent), a fifth of the population is Albanian Orthodox and one tenth is Roman Catholic. The languages most commonly spoken are Albanian (Tosk is the official dialect) and Greek.

Corruption slows down economic progress

Albania is one of the poorest countries in Europe, with two per cent of the population living under the poverty line. The unemployment rate is 13 per cent (September 2010 est.). Agriculture accounts for over half of employment but remains inefficient due to the lack of modernisation and increasing land fragmentation.

As a result of the economic crisis of the 1990s, many Albanians were forced to leave the country in search of work; their remittances still form an important part of the gross domestic product. Basic services such as health, education or social support also suffered as a result of the crisis. This lack of support has had an effect on the lives of children, exposing them to increased discrimination and exploitation. Violent and organised crime and corruption remain abundant and continue to threaten vulnerable groups in society.

Sponsoring a Child in Albania

SOS relies on the kindness and generosity of Canadians to be able to provide a home for the most vulnerable children of Albania.

By becoming a child sponsor you are making a commitment to helping an individual child in need. Your gift will help provide a child with food, clothing, education and a loving SOS mother.

Please help us ensure a loving home for every Albanian child. Sponsor a child in Albania now.

Situation of the children in Albania

There are an increasing number of children who are at risk of losing parental care, due to economic reasons, lack of social protection and policies to support families. Many household heads have migrated in search of work and this has weakened traditional family structures.

Children often have to start working at an early age, and either drop out of education or work alongside attending school. According to UNICEF, around 12 per cent of children between the ages of 5-14 are involved in child labour. Children from families in rural areas, where the infrastructure is underdeveloped, are most at risk. There is more poverty in rural areas and access to health and social services is limited. The child labour rates in rural areas are four times higher than in urban areas.

Vulnerable children from deprived backgrounds are at risk of falling into the hands of organised crime. Girls in particular are susceptible of being trafficked to other areas of Europe and the Balkans.